Quick Answer: Who Might Benefit From Dexamethasone If They Have COVID-19?

Does WHO recommend the use of dexamethasone for COVID-19 patients?

Recommendation 1:WHO strongly recommends that corticosteroids (i.e.

dexamethasone, hydrocortisone or prednisone) be given orally or intravenously for the treatment of patients with severe and critical COVID-19.Recommendation 2:WHO advises against the use of corticosteroids in the treatment of patients with non-severe COVID-19, unless the patient is already taking this medication for another condition..

What are the typical side effects of dexamethasone during COVID-19 treatment?

See full answerDexamethasone is generally safe. It presents a favourable benefit-risk profile, particularly in patients with severe forms of pneumonia, while the benefit is less prominent in patients with non-severe pneumonia. As the treatment is short, even at high doses, corticosteroids are not associated with serious side effects. Potentially higher blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia) are temporary.Prolonged use (I.e., used for more than two weeks) may be associated with adverse events such as glaucoma, cataract, fluid retention, hypertension, psychological effects (e.g., mood swings, memory issues, confusion or irritation), weight gain, or increased risk of infections and osteoporosis.To reiterate: All these adverse events are not associated with short term use (with the exception of hyperglycaemia that can worsen diabetes).

What is the incubation period of the coronavirus disease?

The incubation period of COVID-19, which is the time between exposure to the virus and symptom onset, is on average 5-6 days, but can be as long as 14 days. Thus, quarantine should be in place for 14 days from the last exposure to a confirmed case.

What should I do if I feel unwell during the COVID-19 pandemic?

See full answer• Know the full range of symptoms of COVID-19. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, dry cough, and tiredness. Other symptoms that are less common and may affect some patients include loss of taste or smell, aches and pains, headache, sore throat, nasal congestion, red eyes, diarrhoea, or a skin rash.• Stay home and self-isolate even if you have minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Call your health care provider or hotline for advice. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house or have someone near you, wear a medical mask to avoid infecting others.• If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention immediately. Call by telephone first, if you can and follow the directions of your local health authority.• Keep up to date on the latest information from trusted sources, such as WHO or your local and national health authorities.

Is a smoker at a higher risk of getting the COVID-19 virus than that a non-smoker?

See full answerAt the time of preparing this Q&A, there are no peer-reviewed studies that have evaluated the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection associated with smoking. However, tobacco smokers (cigarettes, waterpipes, bidis, cigars, heated tobacco products) may be more vulnerable to contracting COVID-19, as the act of smoking involves contact of fingers (and possibly contaminated cigarettes) with the lips, which increases the possibility of transmission of viruses from hand to mouth. Smoking waterpipes, also known as shisha or hookah, often involves the sharing of mouth pieces and hoses, which could facilitate the transmission of the COVID-19 virus in communal and social settings.

What is WHO’s position on use of corticosteroids for the treatment of COVID-19?

The current interim guidance from WHO on clinical management of severe acute respiratory infection when COVID-19 infection is suspected advises against the use of corticosteroids unless indicated for another reason.[8]This guidance is based on several systematic reviews that cite lack of effectiveness and possible harm from routine treatment with corticosteroids for viral pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome.[9]

Which children are most vulnerable for contracting COVID-19?

The most vulnerable children – including refugees, migrants, and children who are internally displaced, deprived of liberty, living without parental care, living on the street and in urban slums, with disabilities, and living in conflict-affected areas – are a particular concern.

Can COVID-19 be transmitted through feces or urine?

SARS-CoV-2 RNA has also been detected in other biological samples, including the urine and feces of some patients. One study found viable SARS-CoV-2 in the urine of one patient. Three studies have cultured SARS-CoV-2 from stool specimens. To date, however, there have been no published reports of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 through feces or urine.

What food should you avoid during COVID-19?

• When cooking and preparing food, limit the amount of salt and high-sodium condiments (e.g. soy sauce and fish sauce). • Limit your daily salt intake to less than 5 g (approximately 1 teaspoon), and use iodized salt. • Avoid foods (e.g. snacks) that are high in salt and sugar. • Limit your intake of soft drinks or sodas and other drinks that are high in sugar (e.g. fruit juices, fruit juice concentrates and syrups, flavoured milks and yogurt drinks).• Choose fresh fruits instead of sweet snacks such as cookies, cakes and chocolate.

Can the coronavirus spread via feces?

There is some evidence that COVID-19 infection may lead to intestinal infection and be present in faeces. However, to date only one study has cultured the COVID-19 virus from a single stool specimen. There have been no reports of faecal−oral transmission of the COVID-19 virus to date.

Can the coronavirus disease be transmitted in hot or humid climates?

From the evidence so far, the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted in ALL AREAS, including areas with hot and humid weather. Regardless of climate, adopt protective measures if you live in, or travel to an area reporting COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

Can the coronavirus disease spread through sewage?

There is no evidence that the COVID-19 virus has been transmitted via sewerage systems with or without wastewater treatment.